Electricity – Part 3

Resistance

Resistance is measured in ohms. We use resistance to control electrical flow. Things that slow down, or prevent electricity from flowing to some place to some where are called resistors or insulators.

Conductors

Electrical conductors have a relatively low resistance rating, and are useful for moving electricity to one place, to another. Most metals like copper and aluminium are good conductors. Gold and platinum are excellent conductors.

Water is a very good conductor, which is why electricity and water is not a good mix. Which also makes the human body an excellent conductor.

Insulators

When we want to stop the flow of electricity, or keep it contained. We use things called insulators like air, glass, wood, rubber, and most plastics are good insulators.

Gutters and what you need to know

Electricity – Part 2

Voltage

Electricity moves because there is a pressure called volts, and those volts are being applied to some sort of circuit. Most utilities provide 240 volts to homes, generally with two 120 volt conductors.

Current

Amps

Electric current is measured in amps. The more current, the more pressure (volts) and there is also a resistance to flow (ohms). The larger the flow, the more pressure. The more resistance, less pressure.

Controlling the Flow

Two dangerous things can happen with the flow of electricity:

  1. Too much amps will cause overheating and possibly a fire.
  2. Electricity may flow where it is not supposed to.

Electricity – Part 1

The Basics of Electricity

Electricity provides us with heat, light and power.

Where does it come from?

The utilities provide the general public with electricity, they generate it with water, burning fossil fuels, or from nuclear reactors. As, we move forward, we are seeing the requirement for more environmentally responsible way to generate electricity.

Electricity is sent from the power generation plants to grids across cities. Electricity can be alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC). In North America, we mostly use AC to power our home appliances.

Common Electrical Terms

This is where the math starts:

  • V = Voltage (Volts)
  • I = Current (Amps)
  • R = Resistance (Ohms)
  • P = Power (Watts)

You can use these in the following formulas:

  • V=IR
  • P=VI

Montly News Letter

Welcome to the Homeowner’s Newsletter! Each month, you’ll find plenty of useful information for keeping your house in great condition so that you can enjoy it for years to come. Preserve your investment—and keep your family safe and healthy—by maintaining your home using the following tips.

Moving into your New Home!

AHITV Episode 32

This is a short video with some tips for families moving into their new homes!

AHITV – Episode 61

Inspecting a home in the rain, is the best time to inspect.

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Vulnerable Roof Areas

An example of vulnerable roof areas and a recommended fix. The typical vulnerable areas are where the roof changes direction or material (for example, AREAS where the roof meets a chimney or a wall). On a properly installed roof, these areas are flashed. Particularly vulnerable areas exist where two or more flashings intersect, for example where a chimney occurs in a valley. Things that obstruct the flow of water off sloped roofs increase the risk of leaks. Skylights, chimneys and dormers are examples. Roof penetrations for plumbing stacks, electrical masts, etc. are also weak spots.

Consumer’s Guide to Infrared Thermography

Learn more about infrared thermography and how homeowners can hire Infrared Certified Inspectors.